Self-induced, noninflammatory alopecia associated with infestation with Lynxacarus radovskyi: a series of 11 cats.

@article{Han2019SelfinducedNA,
  title={Self-induced, noninflammatory alopecia associated with infestation with Lynxacarus radovskyi: a series of 11 cats.},
  author={Hock Siew Han and H Chua and Geetha Nellinathan},
  journal={Veterinary dermatology},
  year={2019}
}
BACKGROUND Infestation of Lynxacarus radovskyi (Lynxacarosis) on cats is usually asymptomatic - most cats are presented with a dull, dry, dishevelled coat, with easily epilated hairs. The physical presence of the mite gives the coat a "peppered" appearance, and previous reports have described some cats developing pruritus and alopecia. OBJECTIVES To describe the clinical signs of Lynxacarus radovskyi associated self-induced alopecia. ANIMALS Eleven client-owned, indoor and naturally… 

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TLDR
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