Self-incompatibility triggers programmed cell death in Papaver pollen

@article{Thomas2004SelfincompatibilityTP,
  title={Self-incompatibility triggers programmed cell death in Papaver pollen},
  author={Steven G. Thomas and Vernonica E. Franklin-Tong},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={429},
  pages={305-309}
}
Sexual reproduction in many angiosperm plants involves self-incompatibility (SI), which is one of the most important mechanisms to prevent inbreeding. SI is genetically controlled by the S-locus, and involves highly specific interactions during pollination between pollen and the pistil on which it lands. This results in the rejection of incompatible (‘self’) pollen, whereas compatible (‘non-self’) pollen is allowed to fertilize the plant. In Papaver rhoeas, S-proteins encoded by the stigma… Expand
Self-incompatibility in Papaver: signalling to trigger PCD in incompatible pollen.
TLDR
Recent data providing evidence for SI-induced caspase-3-like protease activity, and the involvement of actin depolymerization and MAPK activation in SI-mediated PCD will be discussed, contributing to understanding of functional links between signalling components and initiation of PCD in a plant cell. Expand
Self-incompatibility in Papaver Pollen: Programmed Cell Death in an Acidic Environment
TLDR
The importance of SI-induced intracellular acidification and consequences for protein function, and the regulation of soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (Pr-p26.1) activity by post-translational modification is focused on. Expand
Self-incompatibility in Papaver: identification of the pollen S-determinant PrpS.
TLDR
The present review focuses on the discovery and characterization of PrpS which strongly support the hypothesis that Papaver SI is triggered by the interaction of PrsS andPrpS, a ~20 kDa predicted transmembrane protein which has no homology with known proteins. Expand
Inhibiting Self‐Pollen: Self‐Incompatibility in Papaver Involves Integration of Several Signaling Events
TLDR
The identification of components shown to be involved in SI, together with recent progress in identifying links between some of them, constitute the first steps in elucidating how SI signaling is integrated. Expand
Cellular mechanisms for pollen tube growth inhibition in gametophytic self-incompatibility
TLDR
Current knowledge of two different gametophytic SI systems at the cellular level are reviewed, revealing different mechanisms that interfere with pollen tube growth. Expand
Identification of the pollen self-incompatibility determinant in Papaver rhoeas
TLDR
Identification of PrpS represents a major advance in the understanding of the Papaver self-incompatibility system and contributes to the available information concerning the origins and evolution of cell–cell recognition systems involved in discrimination between self and non-self, which also include histocompatibility systems in primitive chordates and vertebrates. Expand
Papaver rhoeas S -Determinants and the Signaling Networks They Trigger
TLDR
An overview of the knowledge of the novel cell–cell recognition S-determinants and the signals, targets, and mechanisms triggered by an incompatible interaction is presented. Expand
Self-incompatibility in Papaver: advances in integrating the signalling network.
TLDR
Current understanding of the integration of these signals with their targets in the SI/PCD network is focused on, including the recent functional expression of PrpS in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen. Expand
Self-incompatibility in plants.
TLDR
Recent advances in the understanding of three distinct SI mechanisms, each controlled by two separate determinant genes at the S-locus are discussed. Expand
Proteins implicated in mediating self-incompatibility-induced alterations to the actin cytoskeleton of Papaver pollen.
TLDR
This review brings together for the first time, the current understanding of proteins and events involved in SI-induced signalling to the actin cytoskeleton in incompatible Papaver pollen. Expand
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TLDR
Evidence for the use of two different mechanisms to inhibit incompatible pollen tube growth is summarized and the limited data suggest the independent evolution of these two GSI systems. Expand
Alterations in the Actin Cytoskeleton of Pollen Tubes Are Induced by the Self-Incompatibility Reaction in Papaver rhoeas
TLDR
It is demonstrated that nonspecific inhibition of growth does not result in similar actin rearrangements and strongly implicate a role for the actin cytoskeleton as a target for signaling pathways involved in the SI response of P. rhoeas. Expand
Evidence for DNA fragmentation triggered in the self-incompatibility response in pollen of Papaver rhoeas.
TLDR
The data clearly demonstrate that S proteins are responsible for triggering DNA fragmentation, and it is demonstrated that mastoparan, which increases [Ca2+]i, also triggers DNA fragmentation in these pollen tubes, thereby implicating an involvement of Ca2+ signalling in this process. Expand
Recognition in flowering plants: A comparison of the Brassica self‐incompatibility system and plant pathogen interactions
SUMMARY Morphological, genetic, and biochemical data on the sporophytic self-incompatibility (SI) system of Brassica spp. are evaluated and compared with those from host-pathogen (HP) interactionsExpand
The self‐incompatibility response in Papaver rhoeas is mediated by cytosolic free calcium
TLDR
The results provide an important link between a transient rise in Ca2+]i and the biological phenomenon of inhibition of pollen tube growth and demonstrate, for the first time, direct evidence that the SI response in P. rhoeas is mediated by [Ca2+]-i. Expand
Signal-Mediated Depolymerization of Actin in Pollen during the Self-Incompatibility Response Article, publication date, and citation information can be found at www.plantcell.org/cgi/doi/10.1105/tpc.002998.
TLDR
It is proposed that Ca2+-mediated depolymerization of F-actin may be a mechanism whereby SI-induced tip growth inhibition is achieved, and a role for additional actin binding proteins is suggested. Expand
Increased Phosphorylation of a 26-kD Pollen Protein Is Induced by the Self-Incompatibility Response in Papaver rhoeas.
TLDR
Results provide strong evidence that the increased phosphorylation of a 26-kD protein of pl 6.2, p26, is specifically induced by the SI response, and argue for the involvement of a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase requiring calmodulin-like domains, whose activation comprises an intracellular signal mediating the SI responded in P. rhoeas pollen. Expand
Identification of Residues in a Hydrophilic Loop of the Papaver rhoeas S Protein That Play a Crucial Role in Recognition of Incompatible Pollen
TLDR
It is demonstrated that both variable and conserved amino acids in the region of the S protein corresponding to surface loop 6 are key elements that play a role in the recognition and inhibition of incompatible pollen in the pollen–pistil self-incompatibility reaction. Expand
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TLDR
A demonstration of SI-induced Ca2+ influx suggests a role for influx of extracellularCa2+ in the SI response, and uses an ion-selective vibrating probe to measure changes in extraceocytes around poppy pollen tubes. Expand
Activation of a putative MAP kinase in pollen is stimulated by the self‐incompatibility (SI) response
TLDR
The enhanced activation of a 56 kDa protein kinase (p56) in SI‐induced pollen is reported and evidence that p56 has MAPK activity is provided, believed to be the first direct biochemical demonstration ofactivation of a MAPK during SI. Expand
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