Self-help organizations for alcohol and drug problems: toward evidence-based practice and policy.

@article{Humphreys2004SelfhelpOF,
  title={Self-help organizations for alcohol and drug problems: toward evidence-based practice and policy.},
  author={Keith N Humphreys and Stephen Wing and Dennis McCarty and John N. Chappel and Lewi Gallant and Beverly J. Haberle and Arthur T. Horvath and Lee Ann Kaskutas and Thomas A. Kirk and Daniel R. Kivlahan and Alexandre B. Laudet and Barbara S McCrady and A. Thomas Mclellan and Jon Morgenstern and Mike Townsend and Roger D. Weiss},
  journal={Journal of substance abuse treatment},
  year={2004},
  volume={26 3},
  pages={
          151-8; discussion 159-65
        }
}
This expert consensus statement reviews evidence on the effectiveness of drug and alcohol self-help groups and presents potential implications for clinicians, treatment program managers and policymakers. Because longitudinal studies associate self-help group involvement with reduced substance use, improved psychosocial functioning, and lessened health care costs, there are humane and practical reasons to develop self-help group supportive policies. Policies described here that could be… Expand
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