Self-anointing behavior in free-ranging spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in Mexico

@article{Laska2006SelfanointingBI,
  title={Self-anointing behavior in free-ranging spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in Mexico},
  author={Matthias Laska and Verena Bauer and Laura Teresa Hern{\'a}ndez Salazar},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2006},
  volume={48},
  pages={160-163}
}
During 250 h of observation, a total of 20 episodes of self-anointing, that is, the application of scent-bearing material onto the body, were recorded in a group of free-ranging Mexican spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi). The animals used the leaves of three species of plants (Brongniartia alamosana, Fabaceae; Cecropia obtusifolia, Cecropiaceae; and Apium graveolens, Umbelliferae) two of which have not been reported so far in this context in any New World primate species. The findings that only… Expand
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