Self-Testing of a Single Quantum Device Under Computational Assumptions

@inproceedings{Metger2021SelfTestingOA,
  title={Self-Testing of a Single Quantum Device Under Computational Assumptions},
  author={Tony Metger and Thomas Vidick},
  booktitle={ITCS},
  year={2021}
}
Self-testing is a method to characterise an arbitrary quantum system based only on its classical input-output correlations, and plays an important role in device-independent quantum information processing as well as quantum complexity theory. Prior works on self-testing require the assumption that the system's state is shared among multiple parties that only perform local measurements and cannot communicate. Here, we replace the setting of multiple non-communicating parties, which is difficult… 
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