Self-Recognition Mechanism between Skin and Suckers Prevents Octopus Arms from Interfering with Each Other

@article{Nesher2014SelfRecognitionMB,
  title={Self-Recognition Mechanism between Skin and Suckers Prevents Octopus Arms from Interfering with Each Other},
  author={Nir Nesher and Guy Levy and Frank W. Grasso and Binyamin Hochner},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2014},
  volume={24},
  pages={1271-1275}
}
Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to… Expand
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  • Computer Science
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Results suggest that chemosensory receptor cells on O. bimaculoides arms were able to detect environmentally relevant chemicals and drive local motor responses within the arm, and could enhance understanding of how this species uses its arms to explore its environment. Expand
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