Self-Objectification and Self-Surveillance in African American and Latina Girls: Links to Body Dissatisfaction and Self-Worth

Abstract

This Thesis is brought to you for free and open access by the Theses and Dissertations at Loyola eCommons. It has been accepted for inclusion in Master's Theses by an authorized administrator of Loyola eCommons. For more information, please contact ecommons@luc.edu. VITA 54 iv LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Description of participant characteristics 25 Table 2. Correlations among study variables 26 Table 3. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses predicting body dissatisfaction from self-objectification, self-surveillance, and moderating variables 29 Table 4. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses predicting self-worth from self-objectification, self-surveillance, and moderating variables 32 v LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Relation between self-objectification and body dissatisfaction at low and high zBMI among African American girls 30 Figure 2. Relation between self-objectification and self-worth at low and high levels of perceived athletic competence among Latina girls 33 vi ABSTRACT Drawing on a sample of low-income African American and Latina girls, the goal of the present investigation was to examine the relevance of self-objectification and self-surveillance to body dissatisfaction and self-worth. Body mass index (BMI), ethnicity, and perceived athletic competence were examined as moderators of these relations. Participants were 10-to 14-year-old African American and Latina girls recruited from a summer camp targeting low-income, urban girls. Surveys that include measures of self-objectification, self-surveillance, body dissatisfaction, self-worth, and perceived athletic competence were individually administered to participants by a research assistant. Height and weight were measured to calculate BMI. Ethnicity information was obtained from surveys completed by parents. Results indicated that self-objectification and self-surveillance were related, and older girls reported higher levels of each. No main effects of self-objectification were found, however, higher levels of self-surveillance were associated with lower self-worth. Among African American girls with higher BMI, self-objectification was associated with less body dissatisfaction. Among Latina girls with higher perceived athletic competence, higher self-objectification was associated with lower self-worth. Findings indicate that self-objectification and self-surveillance are indeed experienced by low-income, ethnic minority girls and increase across the transition to adolescence. Self-surveillance may be particularly important to address in interventions targeting self-worth of ethnic minority girls. Finally, results suggest the vii importance of ethnicity, BMI, and perceived athletic competence in understanding how self-objectification and self-surveillance relate to well-being among ethnic minority girls.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{eCommons2014SelfObjectificationAS, title={Self-Objectification and Self-Surveillance in African American and Latina Girls: Links to Body Dissatisfaction and Self-Worth}, author={Loyola eCommons and Kimberly A. Burdette}, year={2014} }