Self-Care is Not a Solipsistic Trap: A Reply to Critics

@article{Katz1980SelfCareIN,
  title={Self-Care is Not a Solipsistic Trap: A Reply to Critics},
  author={A. Katz and L. Levin},
  journal={International Journal of Health Services},
  year={1980},
  volume={10},
  pages={329 - 336}
}
  • A. Katz, L. Levin
  • Published 1980
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • International Journal of Health Services
This paper is an answer to criticism of the self-care, self-help movement in health recently advanced by Robert Crawford and other writers. The authors review the multiple and varied origins, motivations, and ideologies associated with self-care developments. It is maintained that the self-care movement embodies a broad, popular social resistance to the ills, inequities, and iatrogenic elements in highly technological health care systems. Empirical examination of specific programs and… Expand
Is self-care a social movement?
TLDR
It is concluded that self-care does not presently warrant consideration as a social movement. Expand
All Self-Care is Not Solipsistic, but Selective Citation Surely is
  • V. Sidel, R. Sidel
  • Economics, Medicine
  • International journal of health services : planning, administration, evaluation
  • 1981
TLDR
Katz and Levin have violated fundamental principles of the dialectic method, as they have employed it in their “reply to critics” (“Self-care is Not a Solipsistic Trap”), and the only writers other than Crawford specifically cited and “answered” in the course of the article. Expand
Self-Care as Self-Blame Redux: Stress as Personal and Political
  • J. Kaplan
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Kennedy Institute of Ethics journal
  • 2019
TLDR
The diversionary attention to “self-care” grows alongside the growth of strong scholarship making clear that addressing the health inequities and poor health outcomes in countries like the US will indeed require radical social change. Expand
Lay care in illness.
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  • Medicine
  • Social science & medicine
  • 1986
TLDR
This paper discusses lay care in illness with special reference to research and development in Northern Europe, focusing on two components of lay care: individual self-care in illness and self-help groups. Expand
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  • K. Green
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Evaluation & the health professions
  • 1985
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It is suggested that researchers need to reach a consensus about what self-health management is and then need to invest effort in reliable, valid measures of the construct before a profitable research program can be undertaken. Expand
Why self-care fails: Implementing policy at a low-income sickle cell clinic
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  • Medicine
  • Journal of the Royal Society of Health
  • 1985
TLDR
It is concluded that people perceive self-care as a posi tive influence on their personal health and as a positive direction for the community. Expand
Preventive self-care in three Free State communities.
TLDR
A survey on self-care among whites, blacks and coloureds in the Free Slate also focused on preventiveSelf-care, and large differences were found between the three groups. Expand
Healthism and the Medicalization of Everyday Life
  • R. Crawford
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • International journal of health services : planning, administration, evaluation
  • 1980
TLDR
By elevating health to a super value, a metaphor for all that is good in life, healthism reinforces the privatization of the struggle for generalized well-being. Expand
Self-care in health.
TLDR
Self-care as a political concept involving individual skills in collective action on structural issues had its early expression in the consumer health move­ ment of the last two decades and is found largely within the broader frame of lay initiatives in health. Expand
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