Self‐testing for contact sensitization to hair dyes – scientific considerations and clinical concerns of an industry‐led screening programme

@article{Thyssen2012SelftestingFC,
  title={Self‐testing for contact sensitization to hair dyes – scientific considerations and clinical concerns of an industry‐led screening programme},
  author={Jacob Pontoppidan Thyssen and Heidi S{\o}sted and Wolfgang Uter and Axel Schnuch and Ana M Gim{\'e}nez-Arnau and Martine Vigan and Thomas Rustemeyer and Berit Granum and John McFadden and Jonathan M L White and Ian R. White and An Goossens and Torkil Menn{\'e} and Carola Lid{\'e}n and Jeanne Duus Johansen},
  journal={Contact Dermatitis},
  year={2012},
  volume={66}
}
The cosmetic industry producing hair dyes has, for many years, recommended that their consumers perform ‘a hair dye allergy self‐test' or similar prior to hair dyeing, to identify individuals who are likely to react upon subsequent hair dyeing. This review offers important information on the requirements for correct validation of screening tests, and concludes that, in its present form, the hair dye self‐test has severe limitations: (i) it is not a screening test but a diagnostic test; (ii) it… 
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