Self‐Determination, Perception of Peer Pressure, and Drinking Among College Students1

@article{Knee2002SelfDeterminationPO,
  title={Self‐Determination, Perception of Peer Pressure, and Drinking Among College Students1},
  author={Christopher Knee and Clayton Neighbors},
  journal={Journal of Applied Social Psychology},
  year={2002},
  volume={32},
  pages={522-543}
}
Based on self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985b), the present research tested a model that incorporated motivational orientation, extrinsic reasons for drinking, and perceptions of peer pressure as predictors of drinking among college students. In a sample of undergraduates, support was found for a path model in which global motivation predicted extrinsic reasons for drinking, which predicted perceptions of peer pressure, which in turn predicted alcohol consumption. In addition, the… 

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