Selectivity in cornified envelop binding of ceramides in human skin and the role of LXR inactivation on ceramide binding.

@article{Boiten2019SelectivityIC,
  title={Selectivity in cornified envelop binding of ceramides in human skin and the role of LXR inactivation on ceramide binding.},
  author={Walter A. Boiten and Richard W J Helder and Jeroen van Smeden and Joke A. Bouwstra},
  journal={Biochimica et biophysica acta. Molecular and cell biology of lipids},
  year={2019},
  volume={1864 9},
  pages={
          1206-1213
        }
}
Comprehensive characterization and simultaneous analysis of overall lipids in reconstructed human epidermis using NPLC/HR-MSn: 1-O-E (EO) Cer, a new ceramide subclass
TLDR
The lipidomic approach offers a direct access to epidermis biomarkers, and a new subclass of ceramides, 1-O-Acyl Omega-linoleoyloxy ceramide, has been highlighted, which can contribute to the skin barrier.
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TLDR
A leading optimization approach substantially improved the epidermal morphogenesis, barrier formation, and functionality in the full-thickness models (FTMs), which therefore better resembled native human skin.
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TLDR
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TLDR
Data indicate that involucrin, envoplakin, periplakin, and possibly other structural proteins serve as substrates for the attachment of ceramides by ester linkages to the CE for barrier function in human epidermis.
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Gene expression profiling of Ugcg-mutant skin revealed a subset of differentially expressed genes involved in lipid signaling and epidermal differentiation/proliferation, correlating to human skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.
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TLDR
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TLDR
The results suggest that the amount of covalently bound ceramides is highly correlated with the barrier function of the skin, and that covalent bound cer amides play an important role in the formation of lamellar structures, and are involved in the maintenance of the barrierfunction of theskin.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Results show that all of the omega-hydroxyceramides of corneocyte lipid envelopes are attached to protein through their omega-Hydroxyl groups.
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