Selective ligands and cellular effectors of a G protein-coupled endothelial cannabinoid receptor.

@article{Offertler2003SelectiveLA,
  title={Selective ligands and cellular effectors of a G protein-coupled endothelial cannabinoid receptor.},
  author={L{\'a}szl{\'o} Offert{\'a}ler and Fong Ming Mo and Sandor Batkai and Jie Liu and Malcolm Begg and Raj Kumar Razdan and Billy R. Martin and Richard D. Bukoski and George Kunos},
  journal={Molecular pharmacology},
  year={2003},
  volume={63 3},
  pages={
          699-705
        }
}
The cannabinoid analog abnormal cannabidiol [abn-cbd; (-)-4-(3-3,4-trans-p-menthadien-[1,8]-yl)-olivetol] does not bind to CB(1) or CB(2) receptors, yet it acts as a full agonist in relaxing rat isolated mesenteric artery segments. Vasorelaxation by abn-cbd is endothelium-dependent, pertussis toxin-sensitive, and is inhibited by the BK(Ca) channel inhibitor charybdotoxin, but not by the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or by the vanilloid VR1 receptor… 

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