Selective hunting of juveniles as a cause of the imperceptible overkill of the Australian Pleistocene megafauna

@article{Brook2006SelectiveHO,
  title={Selective hunting of juveniles as a cause of the imperceptible overkill of the Australian Pleistocene megafauna},
  author={Barry W. Brook and Christopher N. Johnson},
  journal={Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology},
  year={2006},
  volume={30},
  pages={39 - 48}
}
Overkill by human hunting has been cited consistently as a likely cause of the Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions in Australia, but little archaeological evidence has been found to support the notion of prehistoric Aboriginal people engaging in specialised “big game” hunting more than 40 millennia ago. Here we develop a demographic population model that considers explicitly the potential impact of harvest of small, immature (and presumably more vulnerable) individuals of the largest known… Expand
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