Selective defecation and selective foraging: Antiparasite behavior in wild ungulates?

@article{Ezenwa2004SelectiveDA,
  title={Selective defecation and selective foraging: Antiparasite behavior in wild ungulates?},
  author={V. Ezenwa},
  journal={Ethology},
  year={2004},
  volume={110},
  pages={851-862}
}
Selective defecation and selective foraging are two potential antiparasite behaviors used by grazing ungulates to reduce infection by fecal–oral transmitted parasites. [...] Key Result By quantifying parasite levels in the environment in relation to the defecation patterns of three species, dik-dik (Madoqua kirkii), Grant’s gazelle (Gazella granti), and impala (Aepyceros melampus), I found that nematode larval concentrations in pasture were higher in the vicinity of clusters of feces (dung middens) compared to…Expand
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