Selective attention and distractor frequency in naming performance: comment on Dhooge and Hartsuiker (2010).

Abstract

E. Dhooge and R. J. Hartsuiker (2010) reported experiments showing that picture naming takes longer with low- than high-frequency distractor words, replicating M. Miozzo and A. Caramazza (2003). In addition, they showed that this distractor-frequency effect disappears when distractors are masked or preexposed. These findings were taken to refute models like WEAVER++ (A. Roelofs, 2003) in which words are selected by competition. However, Dhooge and Hartsuiker do not take into account that according to this model, picture-word interference taps not only into word production but also into attentional processes. Here, the authors indicate that WEAVER++ contains an attentional mechanism that accounts for the distractor-frequency effect (A. Roelofs, 2005). Moreover, the authors demonstrate that the model accounts for the influence of masking and preexposure, and does so in a simpler way than the response exclusion through self-monitoring account advanced by Dhooge and Hartsuiker.

DOI: 10.1037/a0023328

1 Figure or Table

01020201520162017
Citations per Year

Citation Velocity: 8

Averaging 8 citations per year over the last 3 years.

Learn more about how we calculate this metric in our FAQ.

Cite this paper

@article{Roelofs2011SelectiveAA, title={Selective attention and distractor frequency in naming performance: comment on Dhooge and Hartsuiker (2010).}, author={Ardi Roelofs and Vit{\'o}ria Piai and Herbert Schriefers}, journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition}, year={2011}, volume={37 4}, pages={1032-8} }