Selective and divided attention in animals

@article{Zentall2005SelectiveAD,
  title={Selective and divided attention in animals},
  author={Thomas R. Zentall},
  journal={Behavioural Processes},
  year={2005},
  volume={69},
  pages={1-15}
}
  • T. Zentall
  • Published 29 April 2005
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Behavioural Processes
This article reviews some of the research on attentional processes in animals. In the traditional approach to selective attention, it is proposed that in addition to specific response attachments, animals also learn something about the dimension along which the stimuli fall (e.g., hue, brightness, or line orientation). More recently, there has been an attempt to find animal analogs to methodologies originally applied to research with humans. One line of research has been directed to the… 
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