Selective activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors suppresses spinal fos protein expression and pain behavior in a rat model of inflammation

@article{Nackley2003SelectiveAO,
  title={Selective activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors suppresses spinal fos protein expression and pain behavior in a rat model of inflammation},
  author={Andrea G. Nackley and Alexandros Makriyannis and Andrea G. Hohmann},
  journal={Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={119},
  pages={747-757}
}
Activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors suppresses C-fiber responses and windup in spinal wide dynamic range neurons in the absence and presence of inflammation.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors is sufficient to suppress neuronal activity at central levels of processing in the spinal dorsal horn and this findings are consistent with the ability of AM1241 to normalize nociceptive thresholds and produce antinociception in inflammatory pain states.
Selective Activation of Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors Suppresses Neuropathic Nociception Induced by Treatment with the Chemotherapeutic Agent Paclitaxel in Rats
TLDR
The data suggest that cannabinoid CB2 receptors may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of chemotherapy-evoked neuropathy and blocked the antiallodynic effects of both (R,S)-AM1241 and AM1714.
CB2 cannabinoid receptor activation produces antinociception by stimulating peripheral release of endogenous opioids.
  • M. Ibrahim, F. Porreca, T. Malan
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2005
TLDR
Test the hypothesis that CB(2) receptor activation stimulates release from keratinocytes of the endogenous opioid beta-endorphin, which then acts at local neuronal mu-opioid receptors to inhibit nociception and indicates anatomical specificity of opioid effects.
Cannabinoid CB2 receptor activation inhibits mechanically evoked responses of wide dynamic range dorsal horn neurons in naïve rats and in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain
TLDR
It is demonstrated that activation of peripheral CB2 receptors attenuates both innocuous‐ and noxious‐evoked responses of WDR neurons in models of acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain.
CB1 and CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists Induce Peripheral Antinociception by Activation of the Endogenous Noradrenergic System
TLDR
Evidence is provided that anandamide and PEA induce peripheral antinociception activating CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, respectively, stimulating an endogenous norepinephrine release that activates peripheral adrenoceptors inducing antinOCiception.
Selective Activation of Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors Suppresses Hyperalgesia Evoked by Intradermal Capsaicin
TLDR
The data indicate that AM1241 suppresses capsaicin-evoked hyperalgesia and allodynia through a local site of action and provide evidence that actions at cannabinoid CB2 receptors are sufficient to normalize nociceptive thresholds and produce antinociception in persistent pain states.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 58 REFERENCES
Intrathecal cannabinoid administration suppresses noxious stimulus-evoked Fos protein-like immunoreactivity in rat spinal cord: comparison with morphine.
TLDR
Cannabinoids suppress nociceptive processing, in part, through actions at the spinal level, however, morphine showed greater potency and efficacy than CP55,940 in suppressing formalin-induced FLI following spinal administration.
Cannabinoid suppression of noxious heat-evoked activity in wide dynamic range neurons in the lumbar dorsal horn of the rat.
TLDR
The findings suggest that cannabinoids selectively modulate the activity of nociceptive neurons in the spinal dorsal horn by actions at CB1 receptors, which represents a suppression of pain neurotransmission.
Activation of spinal cannabinoid 1 receptors inhibits C‐fibre driven hyperexcitable neuronal responses and increases [35S]GTPγS binding in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of noninflamed and inflamed rats
TLDR
Sustained, but not enhanced, antinociceptive effects of HU210 following carrageenin inflammation are reported, strengthening the body of evidence suggesting CB agonists may be an important novel analgesic approach for the treatment of sustained pain states.
Local administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol attenuates capsaicin-induced thermal nociception in rhesus monkeys: a peripheral cannabinoid action
TLDR
Functional evidence is provided that activation of peripheral cannabinoid CB1 receptors can attenuate capsaicin-induced thermal nociception in non-human primates and suggests a new approach for cannabinoids in pain management.
...
...