Selective Advantage of Recombination in Evolving Protein Populations: a Lattice Model Study.

Abstract

Recent research has attempted to clarify the contributions of several mutational processes, such as substitutions or homologous recombination. Simplistic, tractable protein models, which determine the compact native structure phenotype from the sequence genotype, are well-suited to such studies. In this paper, we use a lattice-protein model to examine the effects of point mutation and homologous recombination on evolving populations of proteins. We find that while the majority of mutation and recombination events are neutral or deleterious, recombination is far more likely to be beneficial. This results in a faster increase in fitness during evolution, although the final fitness level is not significantly changed. This transient advantage provides an evolutionary advantage to subpopulations that undergo recombination, allowing fixation of recombination to occur in the population.

Cite this paper

@article{Williams2006SelectiveAO, title={Selective Advantage of Recombination in Evolving Protein Populations: a Lattice Model Study.}, author={Paul D. Williams and David D. Pollock and Richard A. Goldstein}, journal={International journal of modern physics. C, Physics and computers}, year={2006}, volume={17 1}, pages={75-90} }