Selection of tool diameter by New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides

@article{Chappell2003SelectionOT,
  title={Selection of tool diameter by New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides},
  author={Jackie Chappell and Alex Kacelnik},
  journal={Animal Cognition},
  year={2003},
  volume={7},
  pages={121-127}
}
One important element of complex and flexible tool use, particularly where tool manufacture is involved, is the ability to select or manufacture appropriate tools anticipating the needs of any given task—an ability that has been rarely tested in non-primates. We examine aspects of this ability in New Caledonian crows—a species known to be extraordinary tool users and manufacturers. In a 2002 study, Chappell and Kacelnik showed that these crows were able to select a tool of the appropriate… Expand

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