Selection of Effective Stone Tools by Wild Bearded Capuchin Monkeys

@article{Visalberghi2009SelectionOE,
  title={Selection of Effective Stone Tools by Wild Bearded Capuchin Monkeys},
  author={Elisabetta Visalberghi and Elsa Addessi and Valentina Truppa and Noemi Spagnoletti and Eduardo B. Ottoni and Patr{\'i}cia Izar and Dorothy Munkenbeck Fragaszy},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={213-217}
}
Appreciation of objects' affordances and planning is a hallmark of human technology. Archeological evidence suggests that Pliocene hominins selected raw material for tool making [1, 2]. Stone pounding has been considered a precursor to tool making [3, 4], and tool use by living primates provides insight into the origins of material selection by human ancestors. No study has experimentally investigated selectivity of stone tools in wild animals, although chimpanzees appear to select stones… Expand
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