Selection for low mortality in laying hens affects catecholamine levels in the arcopallium, a brain area involved in fear and motor regulation

@article{Kops2013SelectionFL,
  title={Selection for low mortality in laying hens affects catecholamine levels in the arcopallium, a brain area involved in fear and motor regulation},
  author={Marjolein S. Kops and Elske N. de Haas and T. Bas Rodenburg and Esther D. Ellen and Gerdien A. H. Korte-Bouws and Berend Olivier and Onur G{\"u}nt{\"u}rk{\"u}n and Sijmen Mechiel Korte and J. Elizabeth Bolhuis},
  journal={Behavioural Brain Research},
  year={2013},
  volume={257},
  pages={54-61}
}

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