Seizure response dogs: Evaluation of a formal training program

@article{Kirton2008SeizureRD,
  title={Seizure response dogs: Evaluation of a formal training program},
  author={A. Kirton and A. Winter and E. Wirrell and O. Snead},
  journal={Epilepsy \& Behavior},
  year={2008},
  volume={13},
  pages={499-504}
}
Evidence supporting seizure-related behaviors in dogs is emerging. The methods of seizure response dog (SRD) training programs are unstudied. A standardized survey was retrospectively applied to graduates of a large SRD program. Subjective changes in quality of life (QOL) parameters were explored. Data were captured on animal characteristics, training methods, response and alerting behaviors, effects on seizure frequency, and accuracy of epilepsy diagnosis. Twenty-two patients (88… Expand
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