Seismic detection of the martian core

@article{Sthler2021SeismicDO,
  title={Seismic detection of the martian core},
  author={Simon C. St{\"a}hler and Amir Khan and William Bruce Banerdt and Philippe Henri Lognonn{\'e} and Domenico Giardini and Savas Ceylan and M{\'e}lanie Drilleau and A. Cecilia Duran and Rapha{\"e}l F. Garcia and Quancheng Huang and Doyeon Kim and Vedran Leki{\'c} and Henri Samuel and Martin Schimmel and Nicholas C. Schmerr and David Sollberger and {\'E}l{\'e}onore Stutzmann and Zongbo Xu and Daniele Antonangeli and Constantinos Charalambous and Paul M. Davis and Jessica C. E. Irving and Taichi Kawamura and Martin Knapmeyer and Ross R. Maguire and Angela G. Marusiak and Mark Paul Panning and Cl{\'e}ment Perrin and Ana‐Catalina Plesa and Attilio Rivoldini and C{\'e}dric Schmelzbach and G{\'e}raldine Zenh{\"a}usern and {\'E}ric Beucler and John F. Clinton and Nikolaj L. Dahmen and Martin van Driel and Tamara Gudkova and Anna Catherine Horleston and William T. Pike and Matthieu Plasman and Suzanne E. Smrekar},
  journal={Science},
  year={2021},
  volume={373},
  pages={443 - 448}
}
Single seismometer structure Because of the lack of direct seismic observations, the interior structure of Mars has been a mystery. Khan et al., Knapmeyer-Endrun et al., and Stähler et al. used recently detected marsquakes from the seismometer deployed during the InSight mission to map the interior of Mars (see the Perspective by Cottaar and Koelemeijer). Mars likely has a 24- to 72-kilometer-thick crust with a very deep lithosphere close to 500 kilometers. Similar to the Earth, a low-velocity… Expand
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