Segregation Analysis of Apolipoproteins A-1 and B-100 Measured Before and After an Exercise Training Program

Abstract

Complex segregation analyses of apolipoproteins (apo) A-1 and B-100 were performed in a sample of 520 individuals from 99 white families who participated in the HERITAGE Family Study. In these sedentary families, plasma apo A-1 and B-100 concentrations were measured before and after a 20-week endurance exercise training program. Baseline apo A-1 and B-100 were adjusted for the effects of age (age-adjusted baseline apo A-1 and B-100) and for the effects of age and BMI (age-BMI–adjusted baseline apo A-1 and B-100). The change in response to training was computed as a simple D (posttraining minus baseline) and was adjusted for age and the baseline (age-baseline– adjusted apo A-1 and B-100 responses to training). In the present study, a major gene could not be inferred for baseline apo A-1. Rather, we found a major effect along with a multifactorial effect accounting for 8% to 9% and 51% to 56% of the variance, respectively. In addition, no clear evidence supported a major-gene effect for its response to training, whereas the transmission of a major effect from parents to offspring was ambiguous, ie, genetic in nature or familial environmental in origin. The major effect accounted for 15% of the variance, with an additional 21% and 58% of the variance being accounted for by a multifactorial effect in parents and offspring, respectively. It is interesting to have obtained evidence of a putative recessive major locus for baseline apo B-100, which accounted for 50% to 56% of the variance, with an additional 25% to 29% of the variance due to a multifactorial effect. In contrast, no major effect for its response to training was identified, although a multifactorial effect was found that accounted for 27% of the variance. The novel findings arising from the present study are summarized as follows. Baseline apo A-1 and its response to training were influenced by a major effect and a multifactorial effect. Baseline apo B-100 was influenced by a putative major recessive gene with a multifactorial component, but its response to training was influenced solely by a multifactorial component in these sedentary families. (Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2000;20:807-814.)

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@inproceedings{An2000SegregationAO, title={Segregation Analysis of Apolipoproteins A-1 and B-100 Measured Before and After an Exercise Training Program}, author={Ping An and Treva K. Rice and Jacques Gagnon and Ingrid B. Borecki and J. Bergeron and Jean-pierre Despr{\'e}s and Arthur S. Leon and James Skinner and Jack H. Wilmore and C. Bouchard and Dabeeru C . Rao}, year={2000} }