Segregation, poverty, and empowerment: health consequences for African Americans.

@article{Laveist1993SegregationPA,
  title={Segregation, poverty, and empowerment: health consequences for African Americans.},
  author={Thomas A. Laveist},
  journal={The Milbank quarterly},
  year={1993},
  volume={71 1},
  pages={
          41-64
        }
}
  • T. Laveist
  • Published 1993
  • Geography, Medicine
  • The Milbank quarterly
Cities in the United States have undergone major social transitions during the past two decades. Three notable factors in these shifts have been the development of a black political elite sustained rates of black poverty, and intensified racial segregation. Indications of the effect of these social forces on black-white differentials in health status have begun to surface in the research literature. This article reports analyses of data from all U.S. cities with a population of 50,000, at least… Expand

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