Segmentation of Highly Vocalic Speech Via Statistical Learning: Initial Results From Danish, Norwegian, and English

@article{Trecca2018SegmentationOH,
  title={Segmentation of Highly Vocalic Speech Via Statistical Learning: Initial Results From Danish, Norwegian, and English},
  author={Fabio Trecca and Stewart M. McCauley and Sofie Riis Andersen and Dorthe Bleses and Hans Basb{\o}ll and Anders H{\o}jen and Thomas O. Madsen and Ingeborg Sophie Bj{\o}nness Ribu and Morten H. Christiansen},
  journal={Language Learning},
  year={2018}
}
Research has shown that contoids (i.e., phonetically-defined consonants) may provide more robust and reliable cues to syllable and word boundaries than vocoids (i.e., phonetically-defined vowels). Recent studies of Danish — a language characterized by frequent long sequences of vocoids in speech — have suggested that the reduced occurrence of contoids may make speech intrinsically harder to segment than in closely related languages, such as Norwegian. In this study, we addressed this hypothesis… 

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