Seeking a mechanism of action for the novel anticonvulsant lacosamide

@article{Errington2006SeekingAM,
  title={Seeking a mechanism of action for the novel anticonvulsant lacosamide},
  author={Adam C. Errington and Leanne Coyne and Thomas St{\"o}hr and Norma Selve and George Lees},
  journal={Neuropharmacology},
  year={2006},
  volume={50},
  pages={1016-1029}
}
Lacosamide (LCM) is anticonvulsant in animal models and is in phase 3 assessment for epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Here we seek to identify cellular actions for the new drug and effects on recognised target sites for anticonvulsant drugs. Radioligand binding and electrophysiology were used to study the effects of LCM at well-established mammalian targets for clinical anticonvulsants. 10 microM LCM did not bind with high affinity to a plethora of rodent, guinea pig or human receptor sites… 
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