Seeing White Bears That Are Not There: Inference Processes in Obsessions

@article{Aardema2003SeeingWB,
  title={Seeing White Bears That Are Not There: Inference Processes in Obsessions},
  author={Frederick Aardema and Kieron O'Connor},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy},
  year={2003},
  volume={17},
  pages={23 - 37}
}
Meta-cognition refers to the notion of thoughts about one’s own thoughts and has been defined as knowledge and cognition about cognitive phenomena (Flavell, 1979). In recent years, meta-cognitive models have provided accounts of the maintenance of anxiety disorders (e.g., Wells, 2000). Meta-cognitive models would argue that the thoughts about the appearance and utility of otherwise normal thoughts generate anxiety. In this article we apply a meta-cognitive approach to understanding obsessions… 
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