Seeds of discord

@article{Smith2005SeedsOD,
  title={Seeds of discord},
  author={Margaret E. Smith},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={434},
  pages={957-958}
}
A useful, though partial, survey of how we breed the plants we eat. 
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Background For centuries, farmers have improved the varieties of their crops by careful selection for desired traits, breeding out inferior strains and choosing plants for their hardiness, the
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