Seed dispersal effectiveness increases with body size in New Zealand alpine scree weta (Deinacrida connectens)

@article{Larsen2012SeedDE,
  title={Seed dispersal effectiveness increases with body size in New Zealand alpine scree weta (Deinacrida connectens)},
  author={Hannah Larsen and Kevin C. Burns},
  journal={Austral Ecology},
  year={2012},
  volume={37},
  pages={800-806}
}
Weta are giant, flightless orthopterans that are endemic to New Zealand. Although they are known to consume fleshy fruits and disperse seeds after gut passage, which is unusual among insects, their effectiveness as seed dispersal mutualists is debated. We conducted a series of laboratory experiments on alpine scree weta (Deinacrida connectens) and mountain snowberries (Gaultheria depressa) to investigate how fruit consumption rates, the proportion of ingested seeds dispersed intact and weta… Expand

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