See Something, Say Something: Correction of Global Health Misinformation on Social Media

@article{Bode2018SeeSS,
  title={See Something, Say Something: Correction of Global Health Misinformation on Social Media},
  author={Leticia Bode and Emily K. Vraga},
  journal={Health Communication},
  year={2018},
  volume={33},
  pages={1131 - 1140}
}
ABSTRACT Social media are often criticized for being a conduit for misinformation on global health issues, but may also serve as a corrective to false information. To investigate this possibility, an experiment was conducted exposing users to a simulated Facebook News Feed featuring misinformation and different correction mechanisms (one in which news stories featuring correct information were produced by an algorithm and another where the corrective news stories were posted by other Facebook… 

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