Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults

@article{Biswas2015SedentaryTA,
  title={Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults},
  author={Aviroop Biswas and Paul I Oh and Guy E. Faulkner and Ravi R. Bajaj and Michael A Silver and Marc S Mitchell and David Alter},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2015},
  volume={162},
  pages={123-132}
}
Adults are advised to accumulate at least 150 minutes of weekly physical activity in bouts of 10 minutes or more (1). The intensity of such habitual physical activity has been found to be a key characteristic of primary and secondary health prevention, with an established preventive role in cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and some cancer types (2, 3). Despite the health-enhancing benefits of physical activity, this alone may not be enough to reduce the risk for disease and… 
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