Sedation and Anesthesia Mediated by Distinct GABAA Receptor Isoforms

@article{Reynolds2003SedationAA,
  title={Sedation and Anesthesia Mediated by Distinct GABAA Receptor Isoforms},
  author={D. Reynolds and T. Rosahl and J. Cirone and G. O'Meara and A. Haythornthwaite and R. Newman and J. Myers and C. Sur and O. Howell and A. R. Rutter and J. Atack and A. Macaulay and K. Hadingham and P. Hutson and D. Belelli and J. Lambert and G. Dawson and R. Mckernan and P. Whiting and K. Wafford},
  journal={The Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={23},
  pages={8608 - 8617}
}
The specific mechanisms underlying general anesthesia are primarily unknown. The intravenous general anesthetic etomidate acts by potentiating GABAA receptors, with selectivity for β2 and β3 subunit-containing receptors determined by a single asparagine residue. We generated a genetically modified mouse containing an etomidate-insensitive β2 subunit (β2 N265S) to determine the role of β2 and β3 subunits in etomidate-induced anesthesia. Loss of pedal withdrawal reflex and burst suppression in… Expand
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Abstract The molecular mechanisms underlying general anesthesia are only beginning to be understood. In this summary, we describe how the role of specific GABAA receptor subtypes in mediating theExpand
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TLDR
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Molecular mechanisms of general anesthesia
  • Y. Son
  • Medicine
  • Korean journal of anesthesiology
  • 2010
TLDR
Current knowledge on how anesthetics modify GABAA receptor function is summarized and the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors are leading candidates as a primary target of generalAnesthetics. Expand
Distinct actions of etomidate and propofol at β3-containing γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors
TLDR
Etomidate and propofol alter the firing patterns and GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of neocortical neurons in different ways, which suggests that etomidate and Propofol act via non-uniform molecular targets. Expand
General anesthesia mediated by effects on ion channels.
TLDR
The main aim of the present review is to summarize some aspects of current knowledge of the effects of general anesthetics on various ion channels. Expand
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