Security Limitations of Classical-Client Delegated Quantum Computing

@article{Badertscher2020SecurityLO,
  title={Security Limitations of Classical-Client Delegated Quantum Computing},
  author={Christian Badertscher and Alexandru Cojocaru and L{\'e}o Colisson and E. Kashefi and Dominik Leichtle and A. Mantri and P. Wallden},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2020},
  volume={abs/2007.01668}
}
Secure delegated quantum computing allows a computationally weak client to outsource an arbitrary quantum computation to an untrusted quantum server in a privacy-preserving manner. One of the promising candidates to achieve classical delegation of quantum computation is classical-client remote state preparation ($RSP_{CC}$), where a client remotely prepares a quantum state using a classical channel. However, the privacy loss incurred by employing $RSP_{CC}$ as a sub-module is unclear. In this… Expand
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