Second symposium on the definition and management of anaphylaxis: summary report--second National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network symposium.

@article{Sampson2006SecondSO,
  title={Second symposium on the definition and management of anaphylaxis: summary report--second National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network symposium.},
  author={Hugh A. Sampson and Anne Mu{\~n}oz-Furlong and Ronna L. Campbell and Newton Franklin Adkinson and S. Allan Bock and Amy M. Branum and Simon G. A. Brown and Carlos A. Camargo and Rita Kay Cydulka and Stephen J. Galli and Jane F Gidudu and Rebecca Sue Gruchalla and Allen D Harlor and David L. Hepner and Lawrence M. Lewis and Phillip L. Lieberman and Dean D. Metcalfe and Robert O'Connor and Antonella Muraro and Amanda Rudman and Cara Schmitt and Debra Scherrer and F. Estelle R. Simons and Stephen Thomas and Joseph P. Wood and Wyatt W. Decker},
  journal={Annals of emergency medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={47 4},
  pages={
          373-80
        }
}
There is no universal agreement on the definition of anaphylaxis or the criteria for diagnosis. In July 2005, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network convened a second meeting on anaphylaxis, which included representatives from 16 different organizations or government bodies, including representatives from North America, Europe, and Australia, to continue working toward a universally accepted definition of anaphylaxis, establish clinical… Expand
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