Second coiled-coil domain of KCNQ channel controls current expression and subfamily specific heteromultimerization by salt bridge networks.

@article{Nakajo2008SecondCD,
  title={Second coiled-coil domain of KCNQ channel controls current expression and subfamily specific heteromultimerization by salt bridge networks.},
  author={Koichi Nakajo and Yoshihiro Kubo},
  journal={The Journal of physiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={586 12},
  pages={
          2827-40
        }
}
KCNQ channels carry the slowly activating, voltage-dependent M-current in excitable cells such as neurons. Although the KCNQ2 homomultimer can form a functional voltage-gated K(+) channel, heteromultimerization with KCNQ3 produces a > 10-fold increase in current amplitude. All KCNQ channels contain double coiled-coil domains (TCC1 and TCC2, or A-domain Head and Tail), of which TCC2 (A-domain Tail) is thought to be important for subunit recognition, channel assembly and surface expression. The… CONTINUE READING
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