Seasonal and substrate preferences of fungi colonizing leaves in streams: traditional versus molecular evidence.

@article{Nikolcheva2005SeasonalAS,
  title={Seasonal and substrate preferences of fungi colonizing leaves in streams: traditional versus molecular evidence.},
  author={L. Nikolcheva and F. B{\"a}rlocher},
  journal={Environmental microbiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={7 2},
  pages={
          270-80
        }
}
Aquatic hyphomycetes are the main fungal decomposers of plant litter in streams. We compared the importance of substrate (three leaf species, wood) and season on fungal colonization. Substrates were exposed for 12 4-week periods. After recovery, mass loss, fungal biomass and release of conidia by aquatic hyphomycetes were measured. Fungal communities were characterized by counting and identifying released conidia and by extracting and amplifying fungal DNA (ITS2), which was subdivided into… Expand
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