Seasonal Use of Torpor by Free‐Ranging Australian Owlet‐Nightjars (Aegotheles cristatus)

@article{Brigham2000SeasonalUO,
  title={Seasonal Use of Torpor by Free‐Ranging Australian Owlet‐Nightjars (Aegotheles cristatus)},
  author={R. Mark Brigham and Gerhard K{\"o}rtner and Tracy A. Maddocks and Fritz Geiser},
  journal={Physiological and Biochemical Zoology},
  year={2000},
  volume={73},
  pages={613 - 620}
}
With the exception of some data for common poorwills (Phalaenoptilus nuttallii) and anecdotal reports for a few other species, knowledge about the use of torpor by free‐ranging birds is limited. Our study was designed to assess the use of torpor by free‐ranging Australian owlet‐nightjars (Aegotheles cristatus). We selected this species for study because of their relatively small body size (50 g), arthropod diet, nocturnal sedentary nature, taxonomic affiliation with other birds for whom the use… 
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