Seasonal Decline in Clutch Size of the Marsh Tit (Parus palustris) in Relation to Date-Specific Survival of Offspring

@article{Smith1993SeasonalDI,
  title={Seasonal Decline in Clutch Size of the Marsh Tit (Parus palustris) in Relation to Date-Specific Survival of Offspring},
  author={Henrik G. Smith},
  journal={The Auk},
  year={1993},
  volume={110},
  pages={889-899}
}
This paper documents and evaluates seasonal trends in reproductive performance in the Marsh Tit (Parus palustris) in southern Sweden. Clutch size decreased for nests started later in the season. This pattern held true both for second-year and older females when analyzed separately. Individual females adjusted clutch size in relation to the relative time of season they produced a clutch a particular year. The seasonal decline in clutch size was also evident for clutches produced in the same… Expand

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