Searching for the mechanism of signalling by plant photoreceptor cryptochrome

@article{Mller2015SearchingFT,
  title={Searching for the mechanism of signalling by plant photoreceptor cryptochrome},
  author={Pavel M{\"u}ller and Jean-Pierre Bouly},
  journal={FEBS Letters},
  year={2015},
  volume={589}
}
Even though the plant photoreceptors cryptochromes were discovered more than 20 years ago, the mechanism through which they transduce light signals to their partner molecules such as COP1 (Constitutive Photomorphogenic 1) or SPA1 (Suppressor of Phytochrome A) still remains to be established. We propose that a negative charge induced by light in the vicinity of the flavin chromophore initiates cryptochrome 1 signalling. This negative charge might expel the protein‐bound ATP from the binding… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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