Searching for information in an online public access catalogue (OPAC): the impacts of information search expertise on the use of Boolean operators

@article{Dinet2004SearchingFI,
  title={Searching for information in an online public access catalogue (OPAC): the impacts of information search expertise on the use of Boolean operators},
  author={J{\'e}r{\^o}me Dinet and Monik Favart and J.-M. Passerault},
  journal={J. Comput. Assist. Learn.},
  year={2004},
  volume={20},
  pages={338-346}
}
Boolean systems still constitute most of the installed base of online public access catalogues (OPACs) in the French universities even if many studies have shown that Boolean operators are not frequently used by ‘non-librarian' users (by contrast with professional librarians). The first study examined the use of Boolean operators by French university students; In the second study, elaborated to evaluate the impact of information search expertise on this use, Boolean operators are explicitly… 

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