Searching for explanations: How the Internet inflates estimates of internal knowledge.

@article{Fisher2015SearchingFE,
  title={Searching for explanations: How the Internet inflates estimates of internal knowledge.},
  author={Matthew Fisher and M. Goddu and F. Keil},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. General},
  year={2015},
  volume={144 3},
  pages={
          674-87
        }
}
As the Internet has become a nearly ubiquitous resource for acquiring knowledge about the world, questions have arisen about its potential effects on cognition. Here we show that searching the Internet for explanatory knowledge creates an illusion whereby people mistake access to information for their own personal understanding of the information. Evidence from 9 experiments shows that searching for information online leads to an increase in self-assessed knowledge as people mistakenly think… Expand
Epistemic Beliefs and Googling
With the introduction of internet as a source of information, parents have observed youngsters’ tendency to prefer internet as a source, and almost a reluctance to learn in advance since “you canExpand
The Digital Expansion of the Mind: Implications of Internet Usage for Memory and Cognition
The internet is rapidly changing what information is available as well as how we find it and share it with others. Here we examine how this “digital expansion of the mind” changes cognition. We beginExpand
The Internet, Cognitive Enhancement, and the Values of Cognition
TLDR
It is argued that the currently available empirical evidence in cognitive psychology does not support strong conclusions about the negative effects of the Internet on memory, and that, in an information society such as the authors', having the skills to efficiently navigate, evaluate, compare, and synthesize online information are more valuable than having a lot of facts stored in biological memory. Expand
Will using the Internet to answer knowledge questions increase users’ overestimation of their own ability or performance?
ABSTRACT Using the Internet is ubiquitous, but not all of the consequences of this habitual technology use are known. Theoretical models and related research suggest that the act of searching forExpand
On retrieving information from external knowledge stores: Feeling-of-findability, feeling-of-knowing and Internet search
TLDR
The extent to which individuals have developed a sense of the relative availability of information stored on the Internet a feeling-of-findability is examined, which appears to be predicted by intuitions about how difficult it will be to generate a successful search query and the popularity of the type of information sought. Expand
Using the Internet to access information inflates future use of the Internet to access other information
TLDR
It is shown that using the Internet to retrieve information alters a person’s propensity to use the Web to retrieve other information, and that relying on the Internet for information makes one more likely to rely on the Web for information. Expand
Judging Knowledge in the Digital Age: The Role of External-Memory Organization
Two studies examined relations between features of external-memory repositories (personal computers) and confidence in knowing. Participants judged their confidence in knowledge related to their workExpand
Your Understanding Is My Understanding
TLDR
The community-of-knowledge hypothesis, that people fail to distinguish their own knowledge from other people’s knowledge, is tested, and it is found that this occurs only when people have ostensible access to the scientists’ explanations. Expand
The “online brain”: how the Internet may be changing our cognition
  • J. Firth, J. Torous, +8 authors J. Sarris
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • World psychiatry : official journal of the World Psychiatric Association
  • 2019
TLDR
How Internet research could be integrated into broader research settings to study how this unprecedented new facet of society can affect the authors' cognition and the brain across the life course is proposed. Expand
Examining the Implications of Internet Usage for Memory and Cognition: Prospects and Promise
The advent of the Internet fundamentally altered the inforational landscape in which many go about their day-to-day ognitive lives. Marsh and Rajaram (2019) provide a cogent escription of theExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 47 REFERENCES
Google Effects on Memory: Cognitive Consequences of Having Information at Our Fingertips
TLDR
The results of four studies suggest that when faced with difficult questions, people are primed to think about computers and that when people expect to have future access to information, they have lower rates of recall of the information itself and enhanced recall instead for where to access it. Expand
Overestimation of Knowledge About Word Meanings: The "Misplaced Meaning" Effect
TLDR
Four experiments investigated the existence and developmental course of a "Misplaced Meaning" (MM) effect, wherein children and adults overestimate their knowledge about the meanings of various words by underestimating how much they rely on outside sources to determine precise reference. Expand
The misunderstood limits of folk science: an illusion of explanatory depth
TLDR
The mechanisms behind the initial confidence and behind overconfidence, the illusion of depth with explanatory knowledge, and the roles of intuitive theories in models of concepts and cognition are explored. Expand
Discerning the Division of Cognitive Labor: An Emerging Understanding of How Knowledge Is Clustered in Other Minds
TLDR
Over the next few years, children come to see discipline-based clusters as having a privileged status, one that may be linked to increasingly sophisticated assumptions about essences for natural kinds, and mechanisms for this developmental shift are examined. Expand
Knowing the limits of one's understanding: the development of an awareness of an illusion of explanatory depth.
TLDR
Second and fourth graders showed a clear illusion of explanatory depth for devices, recognizing the inaccuracy of their initial impressions after providing explanations, and adults' ratings of the children's explanations did not occur for knowledge of procedures. Expand
Source monitoring and memory distortion.
  • M. Johnson
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 1997
TLDR
Experimental and clinical evidence regarding cognitive mechanisms and underlying brain structures of source monitoring are discussed and memory distortion reflects failures to identify the sources of mental experience. Expand
When self-interest makes a difference: The role of construct accessibility in political reasoning
Abstract Previous research has generally shown that self-interest is less influential than symbolic beliefs in determining people's policy preferences. The present study examined the hypothesis thatExpand
Social cognition and social perception.
TLDR
Higgins et al (1982) and Bargh and Thein (1985) have demonstrated that when people form an impression of a target person, they are more sensitive to information that is relevant to their chronically accessible constructs than that which isrelevant to other available constructs. Expand
One with the Cloud: Why People Mistake the Internet's Knowledge for Their Own
The internet is a consistent presence in people’s daily lives. As people upload, download, and offload information to and from this cloud mind, the line between people’s own minds and the cloud mindExpand
Chapter 1 The Introspection Illusion
Abstract Introspection involves looking inward into conscious thoughts, feelings, motives, and intentions. Modern social psychological research has raised questions about the value and reliability ofExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...