Searching for Justice on the Maine Frontier: Legal Concepts, Treaties, and the 1749 Wiscasset Incident

@article{Ghere2001SearchingFJ,
  title={Searching for Justice on the Maine Frontier: Legal Concepts, Treaties, and the 1749 Wiscasset Incident},
  author={David L. Ghere and David Morrison},
  journal={The American Indian Quarterly},
  year={2001},
  volume={25},
  pages={378 - 399}
}
Two women came to the house of Samuel Denny, justice of the peace, in early December 1749 1 to report an unprovoked murder near Wiscasset, Maine. Their families had been attacked in the middle of the night; one woman’s husband had been killed and the other woman’s husband had been wounded along with a third man. Justice Denny contacted the local sheriff, issued arrest warrants, and requested government aid for the fourteen members of these families, left destitute as a result of the crimes… Expand
3 Citations

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 22 REFERENCES
The New England Frontier
The Maine Experience during the French and Indian War,
  • Papers of the Twenty-fourth Algonquian Conference, ed. William Cowan (Ottawa: Carlton University,
  • 1993
For a detailed examination of the treaty mistranslations , see David Ghere , “ Mistranslations and Misinformation : Diplomacy on the Maine Frontier , 1725 – 1755 . ”
  • American Indian Culture and Research Journal
  • 1984
The Embattled Northeast: The Elusive Ideal of Alliance (Los Angeles
  • Bannister to Council of Trade,
  • 1984
Lafitau, Customs of the American Indians Compared with the Customs of Primitive Times, 2 vols
  • trans. and ed. William N. Fenton and Elizabeth I. Moore (Toronto: Champlain Society,
  • 1974
...
1
2
3
...