Search Image Formation in the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

@article{Pietrewicz1979SearchIF,
  title={Search Image Formation in the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)},
  author={Alexandra T. Pietrewicz and Alan C. Kamil},
  journal={Science},
  year={1979},
  volume={204},
  pages={1332 - 1333}
}
Blue jays trained to detect Catocala moths in slides were exposed to two types of slide series containing these moths: series of one species and series of two species intermixed. In one-species series, detection ability increased with successive encounters with one prey type. No similar effect occurred in two-species series. These results are a direct demonstration of a specific search image. 

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