Sea-level rise and its possible impacts given a ‘beyond 4°C world’ in the twenty-first century

@article{Nicholls2011SealevelRA,
  title={Sea-level rise and its possible impacts given a ‘beyond 4°C world’ in the twenty-first century},
  author={Robert J. Nicholls and Natasha Marinova and Jason A. Lowe and Sally Brown and Pier Vellinga and D. de Gusm{\~a}o and Jochen Hinkel and Richard S. J. Tol},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year={2011},
  volume={369},
  pages={161 - 181}
}
  • R. Nicholls, N. Marinova, R. Tol
  • Published 13 January 2011
  • Environmental Science
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
The range of future climate-induced sea-level rise remains highly uncertain with continued concern that large increases in the twenty-first century cannot be ruled out. The biggest source of uncertainty is the response of the large ice sheets of Greenland and west Antarctica. Based on our analysis, a pragmatic estimate of sea-level rise by 2100, for a temperature rise of 4°C or more over the same time frame, is between 0.5 m and 2 m—the probability of rises at the high end is judged to be very… 

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