Sea Anemone Genome Reveals Ancestral Eumetazoan Gene Repertoire and Genomic Organization

@article{Putnam2007SeaAG,
  title={Sea Anemone Genome Reveals Ancestral Eumetazoan Gene Repertoire and Genomic Organization},
  author={Nicholas H. Putnam and Mansi Srivastava and Uffe Hellsten and Bill Dirks and Jarrod Chapman and Asaf A. Salamov and Astrid Y Terry and Harris Shapiro and Erika A. Lindquist and Vladimir V. Kapitonov and Jerzy Jurka and Grigory Genikhovich and Igor V. Grigoriev and Susan M. Lucas and Robert E. Steele and John R. Finnerty and Ulrich Technau and Mark Q. Martindale and Daniel S. Rokhsar},
  journal={Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={317},
  pages={86 - 94}
}
Sea anemones are seemingly primitive animals that, along with corals, jellyfish, and hydras, constitute the oldest eumetazoan phylum, the Cnidaria. [] Key Result The sea anemone genome is complex, with a gene repertoire, exon-intron structure, and large-scale gene linkage more similar to vertebrates than to flies or nematodes, implying that the genome of the eumetazoan ancestor was similarly complex.
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How much does the amphioxus genome represent the ancestor of chordates?
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Whether the amphioxus genome is indeed a good proxy for the genome of the chordate ancestor, with a focus on protein-coding genes is examined, and genome features, such as synteny, gene duplication and gene loss, are investigated.
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