Scytinostroma galactinum as a pathogen of woody plants

@article{Lentz1973ScytinostromaGA,
  title={Scytinostroma galactinum as a pathogen of woody plants},
  author={Paul L. Lentz and Harold H. Burdsall},
  journal={Mycopathologia et mycologia applicata},
  year={1973},
  volume={49},
  pages={289-305}
}
Scytinostroma galactinum (Fr.)Donk is the fungus commonly known asCorticium galctinum (Fr.)Burt. Although it occurs as a saprobe on woody plants and plant debris, it also has been considered by several authors as an active pathogen that causes a white root and butt or collar rot. During the summer of 1970, it was found near Baltimore and also in Montgomery County, Maryland, under circumstances that seemingly provide additional records of pathogenicity. Several other Maryland records are cited… 

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