Scuba diving and pregnancy: Can we determine safe limits?

@article{Dowse2006ScubaDA,
  title={Scuba diving and pregnancy: Can we determine safe limits?},
  author={Marguerite St Leger Dowse and A. L. Gunby and R. Moncad and C E Fife and P J Bryson},
  journal={Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology},
  year={2006},
  volume={26},
  pages={509 - 513}
}
Summary No human data, investigating the effects on the fetus of diving, have been published since 1989. We investigated any potential link between diving while pregnant and fetal abnormalities by evaluating field data from retrospective study No.1 (1990/2) and prospective study No.2 (1996/2000). Some 129 women reported 157 pregnancies over 1,465 dives. Latest gestational age reported while diving was 35 weeks. One respondent reported 92 dives during a single pregnancy, with two dives to 65 m… 

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