Screening for serious mental illness in the general population with the K6 screening scale: results from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) survey initiative

@article{Kessler2010ScreeningFS,
  title={Screening for serious mental illness in the general population with the K6 screening scale: results from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) survey initiative},
  author={Ronald C. Kessler and Jennifer Greif Green and Michael J. Gruber and Nancy A. Sampson and Evelyn J Bromet and Marius Cuitan and Toshi A. Furukawa and Oye Gureje and Hristo Hinkov and Chi-yi Hu and Carmen Lara and Sing Lee and Zeina N. Mneimneh and Landon Myer and Mark A. Oakley-Browne and Jose A. Posada-Villa and Rajesh Sagar and Maria Carmen Viana and Alan M Zaslavsky},
  journal={International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research},
  year={2010},
  volume={19}
}
Data are reported on the background and performance of the K6 screening scale for serious mental illness (SMI) in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health (WMH) surveys. The K6 is a six‐item scale developed to provide a brief valid screen for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition (DSM‐IV) SMI based on the criteria in the US ADAMHA Reorganization Act. Although methodological studies have documented good K6 validity in a number of countries, optimal… 
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  • H. Wittchen
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    International journal of methods in psychiatric research
  • 2010
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Analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing, a nationally representative household survey of 8841 adults found that the SSLRs were informative in ruling in a diagnosis of mental disorder, particularly at the high or very high end of the psychological distress spectrum.
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