Screening for cervical cancer in developing countries

@article{Cronj2004ScreeningFC,
  title={Screening for cervical cancer in developing countries},
  author={Hendrik S. Cronj{\'e}},
  journal={International Journal of Gynecology \& Obstetrics},
  year={2004},
  volume={84}
}
  • H. Cronjé
  • Published 1 February 2004
  • Medicine
  • International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics
Cervical cancer is the most common malignancy amongst females in developing countries, mainly due to a lack of precursor screening. This absence of screening is the result of inherent disadvantages of the Pap smear: high cost, low sensitivity, the need for a laboratory with high human expertise and a complex screening program logistic system. The prerequisites for screening in a developing country include a screening method that is affordable, which can be effectively applied once in a lifetime… Expand
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